Interview: Kaity

Today we’re joined by Kaity. Kaity is an absolutely fantastic musician who plays the violin. She particularly enjoys playing music from movies and TV shows. She’s also quite passionate about the classics too. Aside from violin, Kaity is also a very enthusiastic writer. She specializes in historical fiction, but has also written fantasy. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I’m both a writer and a musician. I’ve played the violin for about ten years and I’ve been writing for just about as long. I love playing songs from my favorite shows/movies — I’m currently learning Rey’s Theme from Star Wars — but I also love the classics too. I have a great love-hate relationship with Tchaikovsky. As far as writing goes, I’ll write a little of everything. My niche seems to be historical fiction, but I’ve written fantasy too.

What inspires you?

Music, really. A lot of times I’ll listen to a song that will inspire the muse and start an idea in my head. It’ll grow and blossom until I finally sit down and write it. For playing music, it’s just a love of playing and my violin.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I honestly don’t remember what got me interested in writing. I just remember working on my first “lengthy” story, which was 12 pages at the time. That story actually became my first published novel. For my violin, it was simply meeting my elementary school’s orchestra teacher. I had wanted to play the flute since first grade, but you could join orchestra first. So in fourth grade, I took up the violin and I fell in love. Before that, I really had no interest in being an artist.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

For my music, not so much. With writing, there’s actually a lot of emphasis I put on names for characters, places, etc. The names always have some meaning that relates to the story, character development, or even foreshadowing for later events. I love knowing those little secrets are there, whether my readers pick up on them or not.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Don’t be discouraged! Writer’s block really sucks and I went through a period of it for about a year and a half. But you’ll eventually find something to knock yourself out of it. In the meantime, do what you can. Write little scenes instead of full novels. Find another form of art that you can learn or improve on in the meantime.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I identify as asexual biromantic, but especially a sex-repulsed asexual.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I’ve had the conversation with many people about “well, how can you like it if you haven’t tried it?” My go to analogy for that is: you don’t have to touch a hot stove to know it’s going to hurt, so I don’t have to try sex to know I don’t like it. I just try to be patient and answer any questions they have to spread Ace awareness.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

As above, it’s the whole “you don’t know if you haven’t tried it.” It’s frustrating to me, but I just try my best to explain it.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Your orientation is valid no matter what anyone else says, and how you feel is the most important. If you identify as Ace, then someone else’s opinion does not invalidate that. It’s what makes you feel comfortable.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

My violin stays within the confines of my room for right now, but you can find my two books on Amazon! Building Amana and Obscured Destiny. I wrote them both as a young teenager.

Thank you, Kaity, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

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