Interview: Clara

Today we’re joined by Clara. Clara is a wonderful and versatile artist who does a bit of everything. She’s been drawing for a few years now. When she’s not drawing, Clara loves to write and does quite a bit of fanart as well. She’s obviously a very passionate artist and it shows in her interview. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

Well, I consider myself a writer, fanartist and artist. I’ve written one complete novel and am constantly working on my writing skill, as an artist I’ve been playing around with creating a style in digital art and I’ve been expanding into the animation area and as a fanartist I use both of my ‘platforms’ in different ways by writing fanfiction or drawing fan art.

What inspires you?

Seeing other people their work and the things I see in the news or read online. In general I get my ideas either from seeing/reading what other people have made or seeing things online that I want to write something about or draw something like that.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

Somewhat. Ever since I was little I’ve been playing games and thanks to those I’ve always wanted to work at a gaming company like Ubisoft or Bethesda. I’ve always been playing story-heavy games or RPG so when I discovered a certain thing called fanfiction I got hooked on reading it and eventually decided, why not? And so I started to write and by now I’ve written a complete novel in my second language, English. Drawing came from my obsession with Pokemon but I never planned on drawing as much as I am now.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I don’t really have anything like that. When it comes to my writing I’m certain I don’t have anything like that because I feel like my writing changes all the time and when it comes to art I don’t do anything special either, I’d like to reveal something but I don’t have anything.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

I don’t have much as I myself am still quite young, I haven’t finished high school yet. The best advice I have is just to do what you love. If you’re being held back because you feel like you’ll never be good enough, there will be always be someone better but no one can be better at you being yourself so don’t worry too much about it. Do what you want, take criticism but only if it’s constructive and use it to continue but just never let yourself be held back because of other people.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I identify as Asexual and Biromantic but as most people haven’t really heard of biromantic, panromantic, aromantic etc. I just tend to say I’m Asexual and attracted to both genders.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I have never been the victim but I’ve seen it a few times though not necessarily in what I would consider my field. I’ve seen a big discussion of people whom were discussing if people who are Asexual but only attracted to the opposite gender belong in the LGBT+ community. In general when I see it if I know I can form a rational discussion I would engage but otherwise I wouldn’t, sometimes it’s hard to do that but I know that having a discussion with someone who isn’t willing to change views is pointless.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That we don’t have sex or aren’t romantically attracted to people. Asexual is just that you don’t desire or feel the need for sex. There are people who are Asexual and don’t have sex but there are also ones who do. Just as there are people who identify as Asexual and Aromantic but others who don’t.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Don’t worry about it too much. Who you are sexually interested in or who you want to have a relationship with does not define who you are and it won’t make every decision in your life. It’ll have an influence but that doesn’t mean you need to let it rule everything you do. If there are people who are worried about a future, don’t. There are plenty of Asexual people who are adults or have finished University/college and are in a happy relationship with someone. Some people in those relationships have sex and some don’t. In the end a partner is someone who accepts you, not someone who only wants to be with you for sex because then it’s not a healthy relationship to start with.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

On Tumblr // doctorclarami.tumblr.com
Deviantart // doctorclarami.

Thank you, Clara, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Clara Quinion

Today we’re joined by Clara. Clara is a phenomenal science fiction writer who is quite prolific. To date, she has written three novels, a number of short stories, and some poetry as well. It is quite apparent that she has an incredibly bright future ahead of her. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

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Please, tell us about your art.

I write science fiction. Also bits of art, photography, and craft.

What inspires you?

Everything. I’m a highly sensitive introvert with synesthesia. I take in more sensory impressions than most people, spend a long time mulling them over, making connections, and come out with some interesting thought-experiments.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I used to draw all the time when I was a kid. During my teens I got more into photography, and thought that would be my career. That didn’t work out. I got into writing by serendipity: having failed to get into any arts courses at university, I applied for a bunch of other creative courses through clearing, and got into an English with Creative Writing degree.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I write in a multiverse called The Sustained World: all worlds capable of sustaining intelligent life lined up, separated by the Void, yet transversible. The denizens of The Sustained World are called Eltoids, which is a wider definition than humanoid, and means creatures capable of intelligence, communication, and manual dexterity, the symbol of which is a three-noded triangle. I’m also working a lot with black crow imagery: in The Sustained World, the Reapers who take the spirits of the deceased to the Void take the shape of crows.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Do your own thing. Not what’s popular. Not what you think will sell. Not what everyone else is doing. Your own thing. You don’t have to be the best at your medium. Being authentic is much more important.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

Asexual and biromantic/panromantic. And queer, as far as I think that gender roles are arbitrary rubbish.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Nothing comes to mind. In the past I haven’t actually spoken much about not wanting to have sex. Just kept quiet and nodded along when people bring such things up. I have a pretty filthy sense of humour and I don’t mind talking about sex at all, but I always get uncomfortable if I see sexual imagery.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

Not directly, but I feel that it’s been indicated to me that being sexually active is like a further step in developing towards adulthood. Probably by the same sort of people who think getting drunk is a sign of maturity. Knowing yourself and what you like and don’t like is a great step in your development.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

There is nothing wrong with you. Sex is not a fundamental need like eating and sleeping. It’s more like an interest. I have no interest in sex just as I have no interest in sports. We are all different, and that’s what makes us beautiful. Do your thing, and don’t let anyone tell you that you’re wrong because you don’t like what they like.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

http://thesustainedworldatransverse.tumblr.com/ and www.facebook.com/ClaraQuinionWriting

Thank you, Clara, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Cas Fletcher

Today we’re joined by Cas Fletcher. Cas is a wonderful writer who writes in a variety of forms. She writes short fiction, poetry, and fanfiction. Cas is currently working on a longer story, which might become a novel. It’s very apparent that she loves the art of writing, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

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Please, tell us about your art.

I mostly write short stories and poetry, but I also write fanfiction and I am planning something of a longer piece at the moment. Not sure if it’ll be a full length novel, but I suppose I’ll find out when I get there.

What inspires you?

I feel like I have a lot of different stories to tell and I am mostly motivated by my characters demanding that I write them down, however I do feel like another major motivation for me is spite. Ever since Steven Moffat’s lovely ‘asexuals are boring’ comment, my main aim is to include as many asexual characters as possible in my stories, just to prove him wrong. That and his special interest in nonsensical plots and overindulgent twists have set me firmly on the course to prove myself better than him.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I read a lot of books as a child and I came across a book that had been written by a girl who was fourteen at the time, and my little girl brain thought ‘well I’m nine, I’ve got plenty of time to write a book’ (I haven’t and I’m twenty-one now, but oh well, I’ll get there) and I’ve been writing since then.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Nothing particularly special, I don’t think. The strongest aspect of my writing is often the dialogue, so you’ll find a lot of that in the longer pieces.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

My advice would be, don’t be discouraged if you read back a first draft and it’s not exactly the way you want it to be. Editing and redrafting is the majority of the process and if you keep at it, it’ll get there eventually. Also try not to compare yourself to other authors’ published work. When you read a book, it’s been extensively polished and edited, and what you’re looking at is the result of month-years of hard work, arguing with editors and a lot of wasted ink. Finally, let your characters drive the plot, otherwise the plot just comes across as empty and forced. They are the core of the story.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I identify as asexual, bi-romantic.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Nothing especially in my field, but perhaps an abundance of forced, explicit sexual scenes. Once my scriptwriting tutor told me that my relationship is meaningless because I don’t have sex (not that she even knows this) and that was quite hurtful.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

When I first got together with my boyfriend, people kept asking me ‘so does that mean you’re not asexual anymore?’ It’s like they think that it just goes away as soon as you get a partner.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

My advice would be to find as much information as you can. Definitely check out AVEN. It helps a lot to know that you aren’t the only one that feels this way. I’m only just discovering the community myself and I’ve felt very welcomed.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

My original works can be found on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/casfletcherwriting/ WordPress: https://casfletcher.wordpress.com/ and Tumblr: https://www.tumblr.com/blog/casfletcherwriting, whichever you’d prefer, and my fanfiction can be found on AO3: http://archiveofourown.org/users/Nurmengardx/pseuds/Nurmengardx

I’m working on my dissertation right now, but I hope to post a lot more once I graduate.

Thank you, Cas, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Edea

Today we’re joined by Edea. Edea is a wonderful visual artist who is most passionate about photography. When she’s not out capturing the world in pictures, Edea also does a little visual art. She prefers working in digital media, but does dabble in traditional media as well. She’s an incredibly dedicated artist, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

2015-10-10-10-06-16

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

My primary art form is photography actually but I also enjoy drawing very much too. Where photography is more seriously performed (school, courses etc.) drawing is more of a hobby really. Both I do more in the digital field but I also once in a while use traditional ways of creating photos and illustrations.

I also write a little but not very well, it’s just never been as natural as for example drawing.

What inspires you?

Other people for the most part. Although, this depends on which one I’m doing. When I draw its mostly other people’s art that motivates me to draw myself. When it comes to photography it’s more likely that the moment I’m in inspires me to take the shot. I see something pleasing so I take a photo of it.

Also my family is a big motivator; all my siblings are very talented musically, one of them even artistically so they always make me strive for better art.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

To be honest I’ve always drawn but photography became a part of my life when I got depressed in high school. It was a way of releasing stress; beauty has always had a positive effect on me.

dsc_3686muokattu

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Not really, but I often use black and a vivid shade of red (blue) in my paintings. They are very recognizable – or at least that’s how I like to think about it-.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Don’t let other people tell you that you can’t improve. Do you! Try things that seem difficult. Challenge yourself.

And please do not worry about likes/follows/reblogs. They are not that important, the main thing is that YOU are happy with what you’re doing.

mahoushoujoikseu

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I’m a biromantic asexual.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Well, I don’t talk about it that much but when I do people mostly tell me how sad things must be for my boyfriend and that they couldn’t be with someone like me. Many have also told me to get “professional” help.

I’m bad at ignoring it but also too fed up to educate everyone on the issue. Mostly it gets to the point where I have to but sometimes people who have no will to even try to understand just make me so angry that I leave the matter be.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That one is somehow sick or that too immature and that’s why they identify as asexual . Often people also think that one is incapable of love.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

If you have somebody that you can trust, then try to talk with them if you’re insecure or afraid. It might take some time that you yourself are comfortable with who you are so in the meantime try to make things as easy as possible. Just remember, you aren’t broken, there’s no need to ‘fix’ your sexuality.

It’s going to be okay.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

The most active I’m on Twitter, Patreon, and Instagram.

But you can also follow me on DeviantArt, YouTube, and pixiv.

Oh and Tumblr too! I’m always happy to talk with you about art and everything else so don’t hesitate to contact me!

sailromoon

Thank you, Edea, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Zachary

Today we’re joined by Zachary. Zachary is a young writer who has an incredibly passion for the theater. They’re a playwright and they’ve recently written a play about a girl coming to terms with her asexuality. Zachary also aspires to act one day. It’s very clear they have a bright future ahead of them. My thanks to them for taking the time to participate in this interview.

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Please, tell us about your art.

I have been an aspiring thespian and writer for a very long time, and recently have started combining these passions: I’ve started to write plays, the first of which is about a teenage girl coming to terms with her own Asexuality.

What inspires you?

I’ve always drawn inspiration from several different sources, but for all my Asexuality related work, it’s been from a sense of wanting to reach out to people and assure them that they might not be alone. That’s what pushes me to keep working on projects like these.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve always been interested in literature since I was born, as my parents would often read to me as a child. It wasn’t until my high school drama teacher read some of my writing and suggested I try scripts that I got into playwriting, however.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Every play I’ve written, especially Unbreakable, uses the idea of the title in a surface way, but it also persists as a unique symbol, where I use it on as many layers as I can. The word unbreakable, in particular, not only applies to the main character, but every character in the play.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Find something or someone who makes you want to keep doing what you’re doing. You’ll never finish your larger projects unless you have something to work for.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

When it comes to sexuality, I am Asexual. However, I am also Biromantic.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I have not encountered much, if any prejudice, but oftentimes, when I encounter ignorance, I find the best solution is gentle education. Most people will respond well to learning, so long as you keep yourself from condescension.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That we don’t ever have or want sex. I personally do not, but anytime I encounter that assumption, I do my best to dispel that notion.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

It takes time. There’s no need to rush, and no one is forcing you to figure it out. Even if you’re certain that you’ve settled on how you identify, it might take time to feel completely comfortable with it. And that’s ok. Don’t force yourself to do anything.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

At the moment, my work isn’t really anywhere public. If someone is interested enough, though I have no idea why they would be, they could contact me at zwt.wynen@gmail.com. My plays are all currently private so far, but a few are currently going through the publication process. With any luck, you might be able to see the scripts with affiliation with Samuel French Inc.

Thank you, Zachary, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Emmy

Today we’re joined by Emmy. Emmy is a wonderful young YouTuber who enjoys making skits and vlogs. She’s very passionate about what she does, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

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Please, tell us about your art.

I’m a young YouTuber, who makes videos weekly. They are normally either skits or just me talking to the camera.

What inspires you?

The thought that one day I can make someone smile because of my videos

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I have always wanted to be an artist and a friend of mine recommended that I try YouTube.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

At the end of my videos I always remind my viewers the keep smiling.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Keep trying even if no one believes and you, and always- always smile.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I’m biromantic and asexual.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

No

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

People seem to think that it’s not a real identity,or that I’m doing it for attention. Asexuality is real.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

You are valid, and you don’t need to label yourself right away. It’s perfectly okay to be questioning your identity for months and even years. Don’t let it stress you out. And there are many people in this world who are just like you.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

My YouTube channel.

Thank you, Emmy, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Jules

Today we’re joined by Jules. Jules is a wonderfully talented writer who frequently works on rather large and ambitious projects. They also do a little drawing too. My thanks to them for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I do a bunch of writing as well as both traditional and digital drawing. The genre of my writing is usually fantasy, but I’ve started trying to write more realistic stories as well. My problem is that I have a ton of ideas at once, but I’m rarely ever able to find the inspiration to actually write any of it. There’s also a language barrier, since I’m multilingual with Danish as my first language and English as my second, and if I write in Danish, English-speakers won’t be able to read it, and if I write in English, my Danish friends and family might prefer to read it in Danish instead. So if I have to show people something I’ve written (especially my non-Danish online friends), I have to translate everything. That’s a bit demotivational.

Some of my projects also end up being super huge and time-consuming. An example is how I made an entire new language for a fantasy story I intended to write once.

I don’t draw very often anymore, but I both draw traditionally and digitally, as mentioned. I’m more experienced and comfortable with drawing traditionally, but drawing digitally tends to be easier and turn out neater (mostly because you have the nifty Ctrl+Z option). I mostly draw fanart lately, specifically for Steven Universe.

What inspires you?

The tiniest of things can inspire me. Sometimes the general concept of a movie, show, game, book or other things will inspire me, other times it’s a small element in it that’ll inspire me to write a short story around that element. An example is that I watched Tarzan a while ago and was inspired to work out a story with a feral child as the protagonist, lol.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve been drawing for as long as I can remember. I’m a self-taught artist and have never taken any kind of art or writing courses, but I always strive to get better. I stay as an artist because creating art is subjective and a great outlet for frustrations and ideas, and I’ve always had a need for telling stories. And I’ll probably always continue to have that need.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Uhm.. Nope, not really.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

No matter how much it sucks to be an artist because you keep comparing yourself to others, you shouldn’t give up. No one can do what you do exactly the way that you do. And even if you don’t feel like you’re improving, you are. Every time you draw a doodle, take a silly photo, write a draft to a story, or something else, you’re +1 that thing better at doing your particular field of art! So even if you don’t like how one of your pieces turns out, try to view it as something you’ll learn from. No one is ever 100% happy with all of their pieces.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

Biromantic ace/demi. Very sex-repulsed (however that changes sometimes).

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I’m only out to two people offline and no one I’ve met irl knows that asexuality exists, and other people I talk to online are generally pretty well-informed when it comes to asexuality and my online friends accept me as I am. So I haven’t personally experienced prejudice or ignorance against ace people in the writing or drawing community, but I feel like it’s pretty common for villains and robots and such to be called asexual, which isn’t a very healthy view on the concept of asexuality since villains are (usually) evil and robots are emotionless. Those aren’t the adjectives I’d most like to have associated with me.

I try to counter the bad representation with better representation, and make sure to create ace characters of all types, to show that anyone can be asexual, regardless of their other personality traits or situation in life.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

The most prominent thing I’ve been seeing online is the discussion about whether ace and/or aro people belong in the LGBTQ+ community. Another common thing is telling ace people that they just have to experience “proper” sex or whatever, then they’ll like it (also the mentality that ace people just haven’t met the right person yet).

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Sometimes it might be hard to accept that you’re ace and you might often feel alienated and weird, and that’s okay. Your identity is still valid and legit. It’s also okay if you thought you were ace but you realise you’re not! Sexualities can change, and it’s all right to try on different labels for yourself to find one that fits you.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

My Tumblr: http://xylophonic-melody.tumblr.com/
My art tag is simply /my art.

My DeviantArt (inactive): http://wolfshadow97.deviantart.com/

My writing is currently not available anywhere, but if anyone is interested, I’d probably gladly show them something.

Thank you, Jules, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.