Interview: Kelline

Today we’re joined by Kelline. Kelline is a phenomenal visual artist who does both original work and fanart. She’s a hobbyist who mainly does traditional drawings and watercolors, although she also dabbles in digital art. Her work is gorgeous, making expert use of bright vivid colors and lines, as you’ll soon see. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

Michelle copy
Michelle

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

My drawings tend to be human driven, I just really enjoy drawing people above all else.

I have my own set of characters that wander around my head, but as I can’t commit to writing anything about them, they’re not much more than vague muses that appear in my drawings sometimes. I have a bit of a world and a magic system that’ll also be referenced in some works but again . . . lazy writer.

I also do a fair amount of fanart, mainly video game related (Pokémon and Undertale are the most recent themes). I used to do a LOT of Nintendo fanart. A lot.

My favorite mediums are watercolors, colored pencils, and recently ink/pens/markers. I do tend to very lightly combine digital elements into my work through color edits or added effects, this is based from before I had a scanner and had to rely on Photoshop edits to make my photos of the artwork look at all decent. I also occasionally do digital drawings.

What inspires you?

Music, video games, nature, night skies and outer space, other artists, dreams, and I guess feelings in general.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

Pretty much always! I’ve loved drawing as far back as I can remember. My first inspirations were my mom, she makes cool colored pencil drawings, and my grandmother (mom’s mom) who was an amazing painter. Plus I was an imaginative kid, and liked illustrating all of my stories and fancies.

My original plan for after high school was to study art and do it professionally, maybe as an illustrator, but my parents (who were kind enough to pay for my college education) wanted me to study something that would get me a quote-unquote “real job.” But the major I settled into “Digital Technology and Culture” (in a nutshell it’s basically digital communication and rhetoric), was a pleasant mix of writing and visual design, so I still have some graphic design work I do in my current office job, and I’m free to pursue art as my hobby outside of work.

Reset copy
Reset

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I don’t think so? I’ve been told my style is pretty unique, that’s good enough for me; I’ve never thought of adding a unique symbol/trademark.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Sorry I have lots of thoughts here:

Check thrift shops for cheap supplies! – Probably won’t have too much luck with more expensive supplies, like paints and higher quality tools, but I’ve found great grab bags of colored pencils, crayons, pens, pencils, and erasers at my local Value Villages. Part of why I have a giant shoe box filled with colored pencils. >w> I’ve also seen basic watercolors and pastels. You could probably find some sketchpads too!

Keep pushing through! – Almost every drawing I do there is a point, usually early on, where I absolutely hate it and want to scrap it. But over time I’ve learned that if you can push past that point, keep adjusting the sketch, add shading, change the colors, I can get it to a point where I love, like, or am at least “okay with” the drawing.

Don’t be afraid to erase! – This was a mantra of one of my college drawing instructors, and I still think about and use it. Basically if you just know something is off with your work, don’t be afraid to fix it, even if it means completely starting over. Don’t stress so much about messing up what you have now to not fix something that’s bothering you. If nothing else, I think forcing yourself to acknowledge and fix the error could lead to improvement in future drawings. But also keep in mind:

You have to stop at some point – Advice from an editing teacher that I also think about when I draw. If you’re a person who is a perfectionist or an overachiever, know that there’s never going to be a point where the drawing will feel 100%, completely perfect, flawless. Especially since we are our own worst critics (and also have spent the past 8 hours looking at the bloody thing), we’re going to see every little error in a drawing. But there has to be a point where you have to let go and call it done. It probably varies by artist, but for me it’s when it gets too exhausting to keep working on it, and I feel okay calling it done.

Above all, don’t give up! – Art can be frustrating, it can be emotionally draining, and it can be tough to see people who seem more talented or popular than yourself. But if you love it and/or it’s a part of who you are, don’t give up. It’s still so worth it, as an expression of who you are and what you feel, what you love and care about. It’s worth it to see yourself improve, and realize you’re creating things you once couldn’t, or better than you once could.

take care copy
Take Care

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

Asexual definitely, but I’m very unsure where my romantic orientation lies. I used to think I was hetero, but realizing I’m ace has kind of opened new ideas for me.

I think I’m either heteromantic, panromantic, or aromantic. Pan is my current thought, but I feel generally not wanting a relationship right now, so it’ll be hard to say until my heart’s ready for that again, if it ever is.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Ace ignorance is pretty common everywhere; I’ve never personally encountered ace prejudice, either in my drawing/art sharing experiences or in my past or current jobs. I see ace prejudice on Tumblr more than anywhere else. <_<

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

The most common? I don’t know, I don’t really talk to people about asexuality (I mean I ramble online sometimes, but that’s different). Going off of general attitudes, probably that “real” asexual people would never experience any kind of sexual feelings or enjoyment ever. And that they probably wouldn’t experience romantic feelings either.

It’s definitely a giant part of why it took me so long to identify as ace, and I think also a large part of why asexuality either never came up or wasn’t taken seriously in past romantic relationships, even when I was trying to explain to past partners how I could care for them deeply yet still be very disinterested in sexual activities.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Listen to yourself. If something feels right or really uncomfortable/wrong, listen to it. Don’t let others dictate what you are or aren’t, listen to yourself; you know your feelings better than those who only have an outside view. Even if you think it is “just a phase” and things will change, your current feelings are still worth listening to. If identifying as ace (or any other orientation) is what makes you feel comfortable and happy, do it!

And do your research; if you think something but aren’t sure, look into it. Find the science, listen to other experiences. Don’t just say nah and ignore your feelings.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

In a few places!

DeviantArt: http://kelline.deviantart.com/
Tumblr: http://artsyagnostis.tumblr.com/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/SweetAgnostis

While mostly similar, there are some differences between them. My DeviantArt is the oldest, has the most on it, and where I’ll talk the most about my drawings. My Tumblr is where I’ll post the more personal thoughts or less finished work. My Twitter is pretty new and kind simple and breezy, but I also just started a Throwback Thursday where I’ll be posting REALLY old stuff, currently from the my first ever “sketchpad” I had when I was 5 or so, and might eventually move on to some of the sillier/wackier drawings I did when younger.

Poketale Undyne copy
Poketale Undyne

Thank you, Kelline, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Vide Frank

Today we’re joined by Vide Frank. Vide is a phenomenal illustrator from Sweden. They’re part of a group made up of asexual and aromantic individuals. Vide was also on a panel about asexual and aro issues at Stockholm pride. Their work is gorgeous and vivid, evoking an incredible amount of emotion, as you’ll soon see. My thanks to them for taking the time to participate in this interview.

final1-details

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I’m a visual artist, which is a very broad term. I paint and draw both digitally and traditionally but have also dabbled around in sewing, sculpting, writing and jewelry making. I mostly stick to painting and drawing though. I use a lot of different mediums, like watercolor, markers, graphite, oil paint, acrylic paint, colored pencils, photoshop and paint tool sai.

What inspires you?

So many things, like music, movies, books, fanfiction, poetry, photos, drawings, paintings and real life. I’m very driven by my emotions though, so it all depends on how I’m feeling in that moment.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I guess I always had this fascination with art, I used to beg my mom to draw things for me and I loved to use my hands to create things. Art has always been a part of my life, although I didn’t really try to improve until I was around twelve, and it wasn’t until I was fifteen that I actually thought of making it into a carrier. I don’t believe enough in myself to actually take that leap though, so I’m studying to become an assistant nurse at a gymnasium in Sweden.

untitled

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I don’t really have a symbol or feature, since I think I would grow tired of it and start to hate it.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

It’s okay if your art look like crap, your dance can be off or you could have fucked up that seam, and that’s okay. Perfection isn’t necessary, it’s just tiring. Keep practicing, keep making mistakes, keep working and someday someone will say that you did well, and maybe that won’t be enough, but maybe it will. Learn to love the journey, not the result (as cheesy as that sounds).

yvfinal-resized2

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

Demi gray asexual, which means (according to me) that I need to have an emotional connection to a person to feel sexual attraction to them, but it’s still very rare for me to experience sexual attraction.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

In my field? No, but that’s mostly because I’m not very open about my “queer-ness” around my art. In other places? Yeah, defiantly. I mostly try to keep a calm and open mind when I meet these people, and try to calmly explain my point of view with examples and such. Most of the time they understand or we agree to disagree.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That we don’t have sex or that we just need to find “the one”. Both are complete bullshit, I can have sex with a person and still be ace, asexuality isn’t about our actions, but about our attractions.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

You don’t have a find a label or figure everything out, it’s okay to just be. If the people around you don’t support you there’s always other people in the world, someone out of the seven billion are going to understand.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

You can find my art on my Instagram at plantrot:
https://www.instagram.com/plantrot/

Or my portfolio http://vide.teknisten.com/

You can also buy some of my works at my Redbubble: http://www.redbubble.com/people/videfrank
(or contact me at vide.frankh@gmail.com)

tattoo

Thank you, Vide, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Oliver

Today we’re joined by Oliver. Oliver is a wonderful visual artist who works in both traditional mediums and digital as well. Their style is inspired by cartoons and anime, though they also do realistic drawings as well. Their work is brimming with beautiful vivid colors and wonderful flowing lines, as you’ll soon see. My thanks to them for taking the time to participate in this interview.

1

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I love drawing people. I like to draw realistic portraits, but I find a more cartoony/anime inspired style is very fun as well.

The majority of my work is done traditionally, usually an amalgamation of water colour, coloured pencil, and ink is used. But I dabble in digital art as well.

I’m the kind of person who carries around ideas for pieces for years without actually ever putting them on paper. I find it very hard to translate the bigger concepts and visuals I have in my head into real life. So it’s not often my drawings make it past the sketchy pencil stage before I shove them away in exasperation never to see the light of day. Often times I go through these sketches at a later date, going “this is really good! But it isn’t like how I had conceptualized it all” and back into the abyss it goes.  *laughs*

I use art as a personal casual hobby. I often struggle to express myself effectively in verbal and text communication, so sometimes drawing out what I’m feeling, or how much I love something can be really soothing. So in that regard my art is very self-centric, art to me is about showing who you are in a way others can relate to.

What inspires you?

Other artists always! I love storytelling, especially visually, and don’t think I ever would have found the drive to draw if it was not for other artists around me. I specifically know I’ve been rather influenced by Shigenori Soejima, Egon Schiele and Gustav Klimt.

I can’t really pinpoint for my original pieces what inspires me, striking visual thoughts or feelings mainly. It’s very abstract. I have whole reference folders dedicated to abstract imagines that make me feel ___ to help me draw that visually.

For fan art pieces, this is always much easier. I just have to try and channel what I love about that character, and then think of a dynamic visual way I can show that love to people.

2

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

DeviantArt was definitely a game changer for me. Little grade 5 me was introduced to it by one of my older siblings. I formed a close knit community with other artists around the same age and artistic level as me, and I was always pushed to keep producing things and learning and help them do the same. I thrived there for a long time.

I really wanted to be a professional artist, and had a lot of support in early high school to try and make a portfolio to attend a university art school. But I found once I put my nose to the grind stone and lived , breathed , and sweat art for that portfolio , that art wasn’t something I was interested in pursuing professionally. I hated the restrictions of what I could and couldn’t draw. I hated the class time as I often didn’t want to draw past 20 minute intervals. It was around this time I decided to see art as a hobby, because it was the only way I really enjoyed it.

Now with other obligations and just life in general , I don’t get to draw much , and I don’t see as much rapid progress in skill as I did once , but I really enjoy drawing and that’s something I’m really glad has persisted. It’s so relaxing!

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

No, not really. I have been told I have a very unique line texture by several people though (I’m not sure that’s a good thing though!)

3

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Keep drawing what you like, not what other people like!

And if you’re considering becoming an artistic professional give yourself a time line where you will dedicate yourself to you’re art 100% to see if it really is the right fit for you! Evaluate, after that time line and make your choice from there. There is no wrong choice either.

4

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I’m a Nonbinary Panromantic Asexual.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I’m actually incredibly lucky to live in a big city, which has a pride center that specifically organizes asexual pride events and casual hang outs.

At my job, I work with several A-Spec coworkers. And the rest are part of the Queer community themselves or are very supportive Allies.

I tend to get flack for other aspects of my identity, more so because it is easier to see upon introduction that I am trans, versus asexual, which is only brought up when discussing sexual activities (which rarely is a work topic, which makes the NSFW acronym pretty relevant *finger pistols)

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

Probably from my family, they are all incredibly sex positive, and so am I, so I’m very open that sex is not something that appeals to me. I have identified as Asexual since I was 13. I am now 21. My mother was a late bloomer and she keeps insisting I’m just a very very veerrryy late bloomer. :/

5

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

I never really talked about my lack of sexuality until I connected online with other Aces. Foster a community and raise awareness. It’s very hard to feel isolated when you know others are experiencing the same thing as you are. Plus you will make some amazing friends along the way. 🙂

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

My personal art blog is http://p3hero-art.tumblr.com/
My main blog is http://p3hero.tumblr.com/

6

Thank you, Oliver, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Rachel Staton

Today we’re joined by Rachel Staton. Rachel is a phenomenally talented visual artist. Her work is truly gorgeous and resembles stained glass. Rachel specializes in abstract pieces and her work shows an extraordinary complexity. It’s very clear that she truly loves what she does. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

img_0048

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

My art is a mix of colored pencil and paint pen abstract pieces. I started out using just lined paper but as I became more invested in my drawings I moved onto canvas and multimedia drawing paper. I usually draw and sketch in a sketching book and am working on my second one now, the first having exactly 100 different pieces.

img_0059

What inspires you?

Emotions are one of my main inspirations. When I read a book or hear a song that makes me incredible happy or sad or whatever I usually come up with an idea and just go with it. Sometimes I like to think that the things I draw are memories, because some of them are of places, things, and subjects that I have never seen or been to, but I can visualize them perfectly in my head.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

In school I was very antsy, and honestly still am, so in order to pass the time I started doodling on random pieces of paper. It wasn’t until college that I actually started to take it seriously though. I guess that you could say that boredom got me interested in art.

Honestly, I had no idea that I would ever be considered an “artist”. Right now I just sketch and draw what I like, but I’m sort of running out of places to put everything, and the people who have seen my work like it a lot, so I may start branching out, seeing if anyone wants to actually own what I create, which is terrifying and exciting in itself.

img_0064

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

The pieces that receive the most attention tend to be my “doodle” pieces, which are basically pictures made up of hundreds of different swirls. Despite having ADHD, I am able to focus for long periods of time to complete these pieces, which I’ve been told is something that not many people to do, so I guess you could call that my “signature”

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

If you enjoy what you do, then do it for yourself, not to impress others. Once I tried to put my art out there, but I went too fast and it turned into a chore to impress those around me rather than something I loved. Wait until you are comfortable to start sharing your art, and do it at your own pace. Also, if you think that your art is subpar, remember that you are your biggest critic; only you know the mistakes that were made, so to everyone else, it looks exactly the way it is supposed to.

img_0066

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I identify as Asexual, plain and simple.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

A lot of people who know that I’m Asexual and in a long term relationship don’t really understand how it works. I just don’t feel sexual attraction, plain and simple, and anything I do feel I can shut off very quickly. A lot of my friends will think that I’m grossed out by sex and stuff, but that’s not really the case, I just don’t understand what makes a person “sexy”. (Luckily I have my boyfriend to help explain things, he’s very supportive and I love him for it!) Usually I ignore it, since having them not talk about sex is easier for me, even though its for the wrong reason.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That I can’t love someone, or have a real relationship, or even have kids. Being asexual doesn’t make you sterile, and there is SO much more to a relationship than just sex. I’ve been in my relationship for almost five years, and we still have so much to discover about each other, so much to do. And the best part? He is willing to wait for me to be comfortable with anything, even if it takes years, he won pressure me. If you find someone like that, don’t let them go.

img_8237

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Don’t listen to what other people say. Everyone else has their own identity, sexual experiences, and lives. If you identify as asexual, then you are asexual. Other people can’t tell you what you feel or don’t feel, it’s your own body and your own mind.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

The only place I have my art up publicly right now is my blog; http://soul-sketches.tumblr.com/

While I haven’t posted anything in a while, I think I may start doing that again. Also, if you want a custom thing done, message me, because that is something I am exploring now.

img_8477

Thank you, Rachel, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Emily

Today we’re joined by Emily. Emily is a fantastic younger artist who enjoys drawing. Using mostly traditional media, Emily draws in ink, colored pencils, and has begun experimenting with watercolors. She also enjoys music and plays the alto saxophone. Her art shows a phenomenal attention to detail and a wonderfully vivid imagination. This artist has a bright future ahead of her. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

IMG_0288

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I draw a lot. I’ve managed to take 3 art classes so far in school and will be taking another in the upcoming year. Within the past year I’ve been inspired to sketch more than ever and have filled a little over one and a half sketchbooks with drawings of various things. I enjoy drawing dragons and other fantasy-related art. I normally work with ink, whether it be by using ballpoint pen in the margins of my notes, or using nicer pens in my sketchbook. Recently I’ve also started using dip pens and ink which has been an interesting experience. For color I normally prefer colored pencils, although recently I’ve dabbled in watercolor. I normally use colored pencils because they are significantly more portable and cleaner.

I also play alto saxophone in both full and jazz band, and enjoy participating in school plays and musicals as an actress.

IMG_0355

What inspires you?

For visual art, I’m inspired by the books I read and the world around me. I often find myself drawing flowers or things inspired by the curves and colors found in nature, even for fantastical doodles. For music and theatre I’m just inspired by the passion of the people around me. Music and theatre can be filled with so much emotion. I also have been grateful to have such talented musicians/actors as my friends in my school.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve always been a doodler and recently decided that if I’m going to keep doodling, I might as well put it to good use and try to improve. I still don’t know if I will pursue art as my only career path, but it will definitely be a constant in my life even if I don’t only make money via art. I’ve always been interested in band and theatre. Both of my parents were involved in both subjects in high school and college and their stories intrigued me. I also have always loved music and singing, so musicals are great fun.

IMG_0369

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I don’t really have a signature object in my art, although I do always sign it with Em.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

I know everyone says this, but just keep drawing, or playing, or doing whatever you want to do, even if you’re just doodling a quick BB8 in the margin of your history notes, or learning how to play the Sherlock theme song, or memorizing a dramatic monologue about cheese. Just do what you love and don’t force yourself to fit in with what others think you should do. Even if you don’t want to become a full time artist, actor, or musician you can still do those things casually. They’re meant to be enjoyable.

IMG_0374

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I identify as asexual and who knows what romantic.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I’ve only recently (as in, this summer) started identifying as asexual. I feel like we are generally ignorant of the concept of asexuality as a society, but I haven’t encountered any prejudice.

IMG_0402

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

As I’ve only recently identified as ace, I haven’t really encountered many misconceptions other than the general thought that I might someday meet “the one” from my relatives who I have come out too. In all they were pretty accepting of the general idea of asexuality though.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Story time- the first time I heard about asexuality was probably around 2 years ago in an online chat with a gay guy who was my age. We had met from an online art app and were generally discussing outlooks on life and religion. Somehow the conversation turned to crushes/sexuality and I mentioned that I’ve never had crushes. He proceeded to try to explain what crushes felt like, and then asked me if I had heard of asexuality. I looked it up and then decided that I was probably demisexual because at that point I thought that announcing that I had no sexual attraction was a bit extreme and weird. Now, a year later, I am very chill with the idea that I don’t experience sexual attraction, and there are others like that, and we’re all pretty cool people. Coming out of that story, my advice is to identify with what you feel fits your feelings. Other people don’t know how you feel or what you experience. Worst thing, you’ll end up changing your label at some point in your life. It’s not the end of the world. Someday I might find that I was right a year ago and I am demi or gray. Or I might be an 80 year old cat lady, or happily married with a great romantic relationship. Who knows? God made you the way you are and loves you like that.

IMG_0492

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

All of my reblog stuff can be found (at) ladyknighttime which is where I also post any ace stuff I do beyond art. My art blog is (at) themanyartsofemily.

IMG_0507

Thank you, Emily, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Scout

Today we’re joined by Scout. Scout is a phenomenal visual artist who mainly uses graphite and colored pencils. They mainly draw animals and food, though they also do some portrait work. There’s an extraordinary amount of detail in their work and the colors make the images pop right off the screen. Scout definitely has an amazing amount of talent and it shows. My thanks to them for taking the time to participate in this interview.

FullSizeRender

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I usually work with graphite or colored pencils and I have a realistic style. A lot of my subjects are animals or food. I also do portrait work.

What inspires you?

I love things with bright colors or interesting textures. I think it’s more challenging but also a lot more fun to see the end result.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve been doing art since I was young, and once I got to high school my art teacher really push me to improve. Once I saw what I could do if I put in the effort, I considered a career in art. I’m planning on becoming a tattooist.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I don’t really do anything special in my work. I think I have a particular style compared to other realism artists, but it might be difficult for others to pick up on

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Challenge yourself. If you always do what’s easy, you won’t improve much. And the results are very satisfying because you worked harder.

IMG_0593

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

Sex-repulsed asexual, demiromantic

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I have not encountered any prejudice. I think people care more about how my art looks tbh

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

Asexual people never have sex. It’s a whole spectrum, and not everyone is sex repulsed. Some asexual people do have sex and some don’t.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Find ace communities that validate how you feel. On Tumblr especially, there are many blogs centered around asexuality that can make you feel accepted

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

I have an art tag (the-real-hash-slinging-slasher.tumblr.com/tagged/art). And if anyone is interested I take commissions.  My ask box is always open 🙂

IMG_1246

Thank you, Scout, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Bismuth

Today we’re joined by Bismuth, who also goes by Bis on the Internet. Bismuth is an awesome young artist who currently does a lot of drawing for fun, though she hopes to be a professional artist one day. Aside from drawing, she also enjoys working with clay. She’s got a wonderful passion and enthusiasm for her work, which clearly shows both in her work and in her answers. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

image1 (4)

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I’m currently a high school student who loves to draw, mostly for fun, but I hope to one day make a career out of it! I mostly work with colored pencils and copics, but I also like to use watercolors. I haven’t done digital art much, but I’m working on it and I hope to get better. I also sometimes like to make little things out of polymer clay!

What inspires you?

It’s different every time I draw to be honest. Most of the time I come up with general concepts (like ‘I want to draw a mermaid!’) Or other times I see a character with a design I really like and I want to draw them immediately. Another thing that inspires me is looking back at my old art and seeing how much I’ve improved over the years.

I also like watching speedpaints to see new techniques and then try them out for myself.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

Actually, I didn’t want to be an artist until around sixth grade. Up until that point, I wanted to be a geologist. But then, like a whole lot of middle schoolers, I had a major weeaboo phase. I wanted to draw the characters from my favorite anime, so I started learning how to draw!

Although I grew out of that phase a little, I kept on drawing.

image1 (5)

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I don’t know if there’s anything about my style that would be considered distinctive, but I love to work with bright colors! I started coloring with colored pencils, which pretty much only had bright colors, so they’re still my favorites to work with today.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Draw as much as you can. It doesn’t matter what, it doesn’t matter if you think it sucks.

Everything that you draw makes you that much better.

Use references! They can help you learn anatomy a lot quicker. Just don’t make the mistake of copying another artist’s work and trying to pass it off as your own.

Also, save everything you draw. I threw away a lot of picture from my early drawing days, and I regret it so much.

image2 (1)

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I’ve identified as aromantic-asexual for a couple of years! (Although I might be hovering towards gray-aro)

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Not really! The most common problem I have is just people don’t know what the word means. When I explain it, for the most part, they are accepting.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

I haven’t run into a whole lot of these, but the most common one is that I just haven’t found the right person yet, hormones haven’t kicked in yet, or I’m lying to myself.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Don’t worry about it! It’s okay to be questioning for any amount of time, even when you think everyone else has it all figured out.

And if you think that being asexual is the end of the world, and that you’ll never find love, don’t stress. There’s way more to life than sex, and there’s so much love out there that doesn’t involve sex.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

I’m here on Tumblr as crystallinebismuth and Instagram as the same name!

image3

Thank you, Bismuth, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.