Interview: Cassandra Wolfe

Today we’re joined by Cassandra Wolfe. Cassandra is a phenomenal artist jack of all trades. She’s predominantly a fantasy writer who is working on a novel that sounds absolutely fascinating. When she’s not writing, Cassandra enjoys photography, particularly wildlife. She’s incredibly passionate, as  you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

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WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I’m a bit of a jack of all trades really but my main focus at the moment is my writing (funny considering I’m trained as an art teacher). I work mainly in the fields of urban fantasy. I am currently working on the final drafts of what I hope to be my first novel featuring a bunch of werewolves living in modern day Australia along with a few short stories that I’m working on getting published in some online anthologies.

Outside of writing I’m trained in painting but I find that these days most of my work tends to utilize photography as a medium, with wildlife being one of my favourite subjects. I’ve also dabbled in both ceramics and sketching.

What inspires you?

I get most of my inspiration from the natural world and folklore. I grew up in a family that loved nature so I was lucky enough to spend a lot of time in the African wilderness which made me fall in love with the wonder that is wildlife. There’s a certain thrill that comes with getting up close to wild animals and it hasn’t faded now that I’m dealing with kangaroos instead of springbok. I’m rather proud of the fact that I can and have gotten within meters of hartebeest, bat-eared foxes, snakes and lizards. Reptiles are my absolute favourite subjects to shoot simply because they’re so chill that it makes approaching them a piece of cake.

The folklore that inspires me comes through mainly in my writing where it combines with my love of the natural world in the form of critters that are closer to that world than most people are. I tend to include a lot of shape shifter lore in my work and the fae are never far behind! I also enjoy including aspects of my religion into what I write in terms of how I shape the magic and witchcraft that is 99% guaranteed to be a part of my fictional work.

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What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I was the kid who always wanted to sit down and write stories when asked what I wanted to do; it used to drive my sister up the wall. I actually entered a writing competition when I was pretty young and got to meet a whole bunch of authors at the close of it which helped drive my passion even if my story for it wasn’t what you’d call great. I still own the signed copies of one of Fiona McIntosh’s series and every time I feel disheartened by my writing I find reading that ‘keep writing’ on the front page keeps me going. Reading that little handwritten quote inspired me to be published one day when I was all of ten years old and that dream has yet to die on me.

My passion for Visual Arts came later in life even if, like most kids, I liked to draw when I was young. I actually originally planned on going into the equestrian industry with hopes of training race horses one day and even got a job as a groom at a show yard but unfortunately I had a bit of a tough time of it there. I ended up being rather over worked and on top of a couple of injuries I received I was slowly wearing my body out. I found that at that time the one thing that got me through it all was my art. I was doing some writing at the time but what really distracted me from my sore legs, ankle and back was painting. I bought a couple of canvas boards and some acrylic paint and Bob’s your uncle, I was falling in love with art all over again.

When I finally accepted that working in the equestrian industry wasn’t going to be possible going into art was the obvious choice. And since I had no desire to try and live purely off of my art I felt that being an art teacher was a perfect fit for me.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Not so much in my drawings and photographs per say but I do have a few in my writing. One of the big things is ‘circles’, I love having little tidbits here and there that circle back and link to another part of the story. Half the time they’re completely irrelevant to the plot and very subtle in their implementation but I just love including them. Eyes would another one, I fully believe that eyes are the window to the soul and as such the eyes of my various critters tend to tell a tale in themselves. It’s one of the reasons why all of my shifter characters retain their human eye colour when in animal form.

On a larger scale you can expect to see a bunch of diversity in what I write, half of my characters end up being some version of queer (often less well known sexualities) and I try to limit the amount of cis, straight, white males in my writing since they’re over-represented in fiction.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Don’t be afraid to experiment; try different mediums and genres, play around, try something that might not work for the hell of it. It’s the only way to grow no matter what your field is. And above all, persevere. It doesn’t matter if what you made didn’t come out the way you wanted it to, you still made it and the next time it will be even better. Even your worst mistake is better than not having tried in the first place.

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ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I identify as demisexual and homoromantic.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Most people haven’t heard of it to be honest, I’ve only heard it mentioned once. That time there was a bit of confusion about it but I didn’t exactly feel comfortable explaining more since I was just a prac student at the time. As a whole the Australian education system is generally anti-LGBTQIA+ with a recent program designed to teach high school students about the various genders and sexualities and why it’s wrong to discriminate being muzzled and defunded by the government over fears that it was sexualizing children. I find that being an art teacher makes it easy enough to get around that prejudice however as half of the artists I teach experienced some form of discrimination.

I haven’t really encountered anything in terms of my writing but if I get published it’ll only be a matter of time considering Wolf Moon and its sequel currently feature at least two lesbians, an ace-aro, and two non-binary folk.

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What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That it’s the same as being straight. That’s the big one online at the moment and it drives me demented considering that most of the people spouting it refuse to be swayed from their position by the experiences of actual ace and aro people. It’s especially frustrating because of the impact it has on the ace (and aro) communities as both are made to feel unwelcome in both straight and LGBTQIA+ spaces.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Ignore the current online discourse; it’s not reflective of real life LGBTQIA+ spaces at all. Most of the people in those spaces have no issues with aces or aros and those who do aren’t worth giving a damn about if you ask me. Whatever your orientation you are valid, it doesn’t matter if things change down the line or if you don’t have the exact word to describe your orientation, you and your experiences remain valid. Just hold your head up high and be proud of who you are.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

Those interested in my writing can find it at http://cassandrawolfe.tumblr.com/ I tend to post drabbles, and writing advice there as well as keeping people updated on the progress of my bigger works there. My art can be found at http://thepaintedwolfe.tumblr.com/ with the vast majority of it being wildlife photography.

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Thank you, Cassandra, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Cherry

Today we’re joined by Cherry. Cherry is a fantastic writer who loves to write original stories and aims to publish a series some day. On the rare occasions she’s not writing, Cherry also loves to cosplay. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

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WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I’m a writer and I’m constantly writing, sometimes multiple stories at a time! Currently I’m settled on one story that I hope to publish and make into a series with several main characters who are on the ace spectrum! I also cosplay on the side!

What inspires you?

Honestly? Spite.

I’ve read plenty of stories where there are only few gay characters and even then they’re written by people who are so obviously straight and they write them wrong or push them to the side. I get angry because they put steeotyoes on their characters and often they don’t even talk about asexual people.  I write to make characters like me and reassure myself that what I feel is valid and okay to feel and, honestly, it’s really helped. I used to feel so ashamed about who I was but writing was the greatest outlet I had and now I’m so proud of who I am.

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What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I got into writing when I was eleven, I wanted to express myself and I loved reading so I thought I would give it a try! I started with fan fiction and I ended up loving it so I started moving on to my own stories and I’ve been at it since then! I can’t think of a day I haven’t written!

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

My writing style is very lax. I’ve always found books to be so formal and stiff so I make my writing have my sense of humor so the readers can laugh and enjoy my story :)!

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What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

There’s always going to seem there’s someone in your field that is better than you.

And that’s okay.

Just focus on yourself and work hard to improve on what you love to do. Writing or drawing isn’t a born trait, you need to work at it everyday. Also you don’t need to fit a mold of how it should be done. It’s wonderful when it’s done your way.

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ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

Homoromantic and possibly demisexual or gray ace. I haven’t really been able to figure out yet, but I have all the time in the world!

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Yes I have. From my own parents, friends, and coworkers. I’ll tell people who I am and they think something’s wrong with me. I tend to explain it but if they don’t get it then it’s whatever, they’re not worth my time. They’re not in a relationship with me so their opinion of me not wanting sex doesn’t matter to me.

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What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

“You just haven’t met The One™”

“Once you have it, you’ll like it.”

“You’re not part of the LGBT community if you’re ace.”

“If you haven’t tried it, how do you know you don’t like it?”

“Not being able to get turned on? That’s a disease!!” (Actually heard that one today while talking to a coworker who was referring to another ace)

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

You are so valid and there is nothing wrong with not feeling sexual attraction and not wanting to have sex. Sex does not equal love and you should not force yourself to do anything you don’t want to do. You don’t need to have sex to know you don’t want it. If your partner was really The One™ then they wouldn’t make you have sex if you don’t want it or guilt trip you into doing so. They would love you how you are and wouldn’t change anything about you.

You are not broken. You don’t have a disease. You are so perfect the way you are don’t let anyone tell you other wise. You have a long life ahead of you, you don’t need to label yourself right away as Demi, gray ace, sex repulsed ace, sex indifferent ace, whatever. Just figure yourself out, safely, and just live life. You are a valid ace, with a sex life, or not.

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Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

I haven’t exactly posted my work online since it’s still very much so in the works but you can contact me on Tumblr (at) Chulacereza I’d love to talk about my story!

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Thank you, Cherry, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Hayley Thorpe

Today we’re joined by Hayley Thorpe. Hayley is a phenomenal young up and coming writer who has dabbled in many forms of writing. She is incredibly passionate about poetry and has recently embarked on writing a novel. Aside from that, she has written quite a few other things. It’s very apparent that Hayley has the soul of a writer and has a very bright future ahead of her. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I am a writer! For the longest time, I favored poetry, although I did dabble in fiction, creative nonfiction, and script writing in high school. However, this summer, I embarked on the great journey of writing a novel, which has been interesting to say the least. I took a four-year magnet program in high school in Literary Arts. I have won three Honorable Mentions and one Silver Key from The Scholastic Art and Writing Awards and have self-published a collection of poetry entitled Heart Sounds.

What inspires you?

I am inspired by my favorite writers (such as Jodi Picoult, Kristin Hannah, and Billy Collins). I am also inspired by writers with whom I attended school, many of whom are now self-published. I am hugely inspired by music, and the playlist for my current novel includes bands such as The Strokes, Wilco, and The Maine.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I like to say that it’s in my blood. I always loved to read, as did my mother and my maternal grandmother before me, and my paternal great-grandmother loved to memorize and recite poetry. But for me, I met a lot of authors through school events growing up, and I wanted to be the one signing books at a table one day. I wanted to see my books in stores. I did a lot of creative writing in elementary school, but didn’t start enjoying what I produced until middle school. But once I realized how rewarding it was, I never looked back.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I always try to include artists and writers in my works of fiction. Lately, there’s also been a restaurant that is a figment of my own imagination that often pops up in various projects.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Specifically for writers, I would say read everything. Read fiction and poetry and plays, even if those aren’t what you typically write. Read “good” writing and “bad” writing and figure out what makes it “good” and “bad.” Try to do something writing-related every day, but don’t beat yourself up if you don’t. Realize that publication isn’t everything.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

Asexual with romantic feelings towards women.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Not as of yet, since I very recently came out as asexual, but I’m hoping for the best!

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

As I said, since I only recently came out, I haven’t encountered many things directed at me, but I think it’s bizarre when people think we can’t feel romantic feelings or that we can never feel sexual attraction. Asexuality, like many orientations, is a spectrum, and each asexual has their own unique feelings and experiences.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Talk to someone. I was really lucky that I had friends who were willing to let me talk through it, and I also had a friend who was experiencing the same confusion I was and asking the same questions. But also realize that at the end of the day, you know yourself the best. Don’t let people put a label on you that you’re not comfortable with, and try to remember that they won’t necessarily have all the answers.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

The purchase link for my book is here: https://amzn.com/0615964389 and you can also preview it there. I’m trying to get a website up, so stay tuned!

Thank you, Hayley, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Dylan Edwards

Today we’re joined by Dylan Edwards. Dylan and I were both panelists on a panel about diverse creators at WisCon this past May, which was one of my favorite panel experiences to date. I’m very rarely placed on a panel with another ace I don’t personally know, so I was beyond ecstatic when Dylan approached me to ask about Asexual Artists. Dylan is a phenomenal artist who specializes in queer and trans comics. He has been part of some truly fantastic anthologies and has written just a ton of comics. He’s currently working on a scifi webcomic that features a number of ace characters. My thanks to him for taking the time to participate in this interview.

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WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I’m a comic artist whose work focuses primarily on queer and trans comics. I’m the author of Transposes, a non-fiction comic about queer-identified trans guys; and Politically InQueerect, which I like to describe as “a comic for people who wish Edmund Blackadder were gay.” I’ve also been in several notable anthologies: No Straight Lines (2013 Lambda Literary Award), QU33R (2014 Ignatz Award), and the Beyond Anthology (2016 Lambda Literary Award).

Right now my main project is a sci-fi webcomic called Valley of the Silk Sky, which features several asexual characters. While I do a lot of non-fic and autobio work, science fiction and fantasy are my first loves. Valley of the Silk Sky gives me a chance to have queer, ace, and trans characters in a story that’s much more focused on adventure than on identity issues.

I also do all-ages monster art and sculpture, called Feeping Creatures. The Feeps are asexual and agender.

What inspires you?

The strange and immense variety of earth biology. The truth is, you just can’t out-weird nature (I mean, there are photosynthetic slugs, okay?). My sci-fi stuff takes a number of things that actually exist and remixes them or cranks them up to 11. For example, spider silk is one of the strongest substances we know of, so I’ve got cow-sized spiders that put out silk which can be used as a primary building material. I stole a bunch of the biology for one of the non-human species from bees, so asexual, non-reproducing members are important to their social structure.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I had always been interested in comics to some degree, and as a kid cranked out several strips that were mostly ripoffs of Peanuts. I hadn’t necessarily always intended to go into comics specifically, but art was always a focus. I like telling stories, and comics merged my interests in drawing and writing.

As far as the Feeps are concerned, my grandmother was a ceramicist, so I grew up playing with clay. The Feep sculptures are made from polymer clay rather than ceramic clay, but a lot of the skills translate.

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Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I do sometimes include Tarot symbolism in my work. I don’t subscribe any mystical beliefs in Tarot, but I’ve used it as a means of giving myself new ways to think about life events. It’s a fascinating source of rich symbolic language, and one that’s available to me as an atheist in a way that religious symbolism isn’t.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Be nice to everyone as much as possible. Simply being pleasant and easy to work with can do a lot for you.

Be nice to yourself, too. Comics can be really hard on the body. Sitting in contorted positions for hours will catch up to you, and physical therapy is expensive (trust me). Get up, stretch, take breaks, recharge.

There is a tendency to promise too much for too little money when you’re a younger artist, but this really does feed into the cycle of underpayment and overwork. Don’t work for free. Exposure is not payment (and places that don’t pay rarely get you very many eyeballs).

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ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

Homoromantic. Sometimes demisexual feels right, sometimes monastic levels of celibacy is more accurate. I definitely have to be romantically interested in someone for sex to seem even slightly appealing, and it’s very rare for me to be romantically interested in someone (though it does happen).

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Sure. Queer male culture is hypersexualized, I think to the point where people who aren’t even THAT horny all the time feel like they have to fake it to fit in. So working in queer comics I encounter a lot of false assumptions about my sexuality just because I identify as and present as male (I’m a trans guy). I get people offering weird speculations about what I must get up to sexually when I’ve never actually broached the subject with them at all.

I’ve seen some LGBT people say asexuality doesn’t get to count as a queer identity because queerness is solely defined by sexual activity. Which is a very limited viewpoint that leaves out a LOT of people, not just asexuals. For sure I think if you’re asexual you don’t HAVE to identify as queer if that doesn’t work for you (like, if you’re heteroromantic demisexual and don’t feel any particular connection to a queer identity). But coalition-building is how marginalized people get anywhere, and asexuals are a group who are marginalized based on their sexuality. Hence, queer.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

Mostly people just seem not to believe it exists. Asexuality was never mentioned as a possible identity in high school health classes; doctors have given me really weird looks when I tell them; close friends have told me I must just be repressing myself and need to try harder to be a normal sexual person.

Also, there’s a conflation of aromanticism and asexuality, which is a trap I unfortunately fell into myself in my younger days. I remember meeting an aro ace guy in college, but since I didn’t identify with the aromantic part of his orientation I thought asexuality must not be the right descriptor for me.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Asexuality has a lot of different manifestations. Just as Kinsey 6s don’t represent all (or even the majority) of queer people, just as binary-gendered individuals don’t represent all trans people, an asexual person who never thinks about or engages in sex is only one possible iteration of asexuality.

So yes, you can have (and even enjoy!) sex sometimes and still be ace. It’s more to do with the level of importance you attach to sex. I’ve always been really confused by people who describe sex as one of the most important things in life. I wouldn’t put it in the top 20. But I also wouldn’t say it’s something I will absolutely never engage in.

Since this came up at the Asexual Lives panel at WisCon last month, you can look at porn and still be ace. Viewing sex on a screen or contemplating sex in your mind are both entirely different from getting naked with another human.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

The complete list of my books for sale, and where to buy, is here:
http://www.studiondr.com/buy-stuff/

Valley of the Silk Sky is available to read online here:
http://valleyofthesilksky.tumblr.com/

Feeing Creatures are for sale here:
https://www.etsy.com/shop/feepingcreatures

If you want to keep up with my goings on, Twitter is probably your best bet:
https://twitter.com/DylanNDREdwards

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Thank you, Dylan, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Cheryl Wollner

Today we’re joined by Cheryl Wollner. Cheryl attended my panel at C2E2 and it turns out she’s a phenomenal ace author. Cheryl is a fellow feminist author who specializes in speculative fiction. She also writes creative non-fiction and is an incredibly productive writer. I could not be more excited to feature her on Asexual Artists. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I’m a feminist writer, which to me is very different than a writer who tells stories which happen to be about women. In my work, most of my characters are female or gender non-binary or disrupt gender norms in some way. Most of my characters are queer, even if they are not ace. Being a feminist writer means I have to be aware of intersections of race, class, gender, ability and so much more because I’m not just writing a story, I’m offering a critique and (sometimes) a solution. I’m a speculative fiction writer because spec fic is the best place to create such critiques.

In my creative nonfiction, I’m proactive in a different way. I’ve published a few essays on my coming out story, being an asexual feminist as well as how speculative fiction and queerness play into my Jewish identity.

What inspires you?

I am the writer who carries around a notebook and pen everywhere. I’ll see a street sign or catch the name of a restaurant and know I want to use that in some way, even if I have no idea how yet. Images inspire me and a lot of times an image will stick in my mind and it’s only when I pair it with another idea that I have a story. For instance, there’s a huge clock without hands by the train station where I live and I knew I wanted to write about that clock. But I only had a story when I paired it with an existing drabble about a world where all adults suddenly vanish at the age of eighteen. The image helped me bring out themes of time and adulthood that might not have otherwise existed.

Like the story with the handless clock, I’m inspired by the bizarre aspects of the everyday. It gives me license to create worlds and characters similar to what we know, but alter them to be slightly off putting or unrecognizable.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

Growing up I wanted to be a visual artist, actually. My grandmother taught art in NYC schools and her house is filled with her paintings. For the first ten years of my life, I wanted to be a visual artist and paint like she did. In middle school I became more interested in theatre and for the next several years I dreamed of being on Broadway and attended a part-time Arts Magnet Program in high school to take theatre classes. It was only when I got scared out of a dance class that I took creative writing. It still makes me laugh because this was the last option available to me, and I sat with the program director and thought, “I already know how to write. I do this enough in school. Why would I ever want to write on my own time?” But I took creative writing all four years of high school and by junior year I knew it was what I wanted to major in in college.

So, yes I’ve always wanted to be an artist, but what that looks like has taken so many different forms. And I still love visual art. I draw on occasion and want to write for animation or comic books, so I’ll definitely be doing more with visual art in the future.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Well, I write about terrorism a lot. I write about political terrorism and view the systemic oppression surrounding queer people, people of color (or any other minority) as a form of terrorism. I’m fascinated in picking apart how one group controls another and what resistance looks like. A driving question in my work is: what is terrorism and who is a terrorist?

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Feel out your art because you’re far more talented than you give yourself credit for. There’s no need to pigeon hole yourself into just one art form or just one style. I went into college believing I’d write only fiction, but came out of college having written numerous scripts and creative nonfiction essays before I ever returned to fiction. I didn’t take a fiction class until my last semester in college. I didn’t start writing poetry seriously until this past October. There are never too many avenues to express yourself because you are an incredible talent.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I’m asexual and homo-romantic.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I just posted a blog on this actually, but I haven’t encountered much ace prejudice and I think that’s because I’ve been identifying as a queer author and not an ace author. Letting myself fall under the queer umbrella means I don’t have to explain my sexuality to anyone. They can assume I’m probably a lesbian and I don’t have to correct them unless they ask. However, I’m making an effort now to identify as an asexual writer and make people recognize my identity.

The only interaction I’ve had with publishers about my sexuality was with <Wilde Magazine> (and I think one other queer publication) and I had a great experience. They said they wanted LGBTQ authors and I emailed the editor and said something about being ace and wondering if they would still accept my work. They said yes so I submitted. And while it sucks to have to ask if I count as queer enough, the editor didn’t make it a big deal.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

Especially in college, I would get a lot of people who censored themselves around me, thinking I was too innocent to hear others talk about sex and sexuality. I encountered heavy infantilization, as if my sexuality made me less of an adult. But thankfully, I usually had incredible people like my roommate to stand with me. Having even a few people who you know are your allies can make all the difference. My mother, for instance, has become my greatest ally and I am thankful every day that I can be open with her and that she will always stand up for me.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

There are people like you. You’re not an anomaly. You’re not broken. There’s nothing wrong with you.

Also, your identity can change. I considered myself aromantic for about six years. Definitely trust yourself and be willing to change. Being ace does not make you a robot or incapable of love or any other emotion.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

You can check out my asexual feminist blog: https://asexualfeminist.wordpress.com/

I am the blog managing editor for Luna Station Quarterly, where you can find my blogs on feminism in speculative fiction authors and favorite female characters. http://lunastationquarterly.com/magical-girl-rising/

I write literary magazine review for New Pages. http://www.newpages.com/magazine-reviews/a-cappella-zoo-fall-2015

Links to published work available to read free online:

“From the Sister of Superman” (creative nonfiction)
“Try to Forget” (creative nonfiction)
“The Resurrectionist University” (micro-drama)

Thank you, Cheryl, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.